English translation 3.6.5

3.6.5 The Buddha's advice to Laypeople (part 1)*

……(The four unwholesome, defiling actions):  “What are the four unwholesome, defiling actions that are shunned? Killing living beings, O’ householder’s son, is an unwholesome, defiling action; speaking falsehood is an unwholesome, defiling action and taking things that are not given is an unwholesome, defiling action and undergoing sexual misconduct is an unwholesome, defiling action. These are the four unwholesome, defiling actions that are shunned”. 

Thus spoke the Bhagavā. After the Sugato had revealed this, the teacher added further:
‘‘Killing living beings, taking what is not given, and speaking falsehood,
Getting involved with the wives of other; these actions the wise ones do reject!”

(The four motivators): ‘‘What are the four basic motivators that result in evil, which one should not act on? One performs an evil action driven by desires, one performs an evil action driven by anger, one performs an evil action driven by delusion and ignorance and one performs an evil action driven by fear. Therefore, householder’s son, a noble disciple should neither fall prey to desire, nor to anger, delusion or fear. Then he will not perform evil actions resulting from these four basic motivators”. 

Thus spoke the Bhagavā. After the Sugato had revealed this, the teacher added further:
‘‘Desire, anger, fear and delusion, through these one transgresses the laws of Dhamma,
And one’s renown shrinks like the moon at waning-time
Desire, anger, fear and delusion, through these one does not transgress the laws of Dhamma,
And one’s reputation increases like the moon at waxing-time.”

(Six ways of diminishing and wasting one’s substance): ‘‘Now what are the six ways of diminishing and wasting one’s substance that one does not adopt? Getting engaged in drinking and being addicted to liquor, wine and other besotting substances that are the occasion for negligence is one. Further the habit of wandering about at unsuitable time in the streets is another, visiting fairs is one, being infatuated to gambling is the next; associating with evil friends of negative influence is one and being addicted to laziness is another.”  

(The six dangers that arise through addiction to liquor and besotting substances): ‘‘There are six dangers, householder’s son, that arise through addiction to liquor, wine and other besotting substances that are the occasion for negligence: Actual waste of one’s substance and wealth; increasing tendency to quarrelling; liability to sickness; diminishing of good report; tendency to exposure of one’s private parts and fading of intellect. These are, householder’s son, the six dangers that arise through addiction to liquor, wine and all besotting substances that are the occasion for negligence.”

(The six dangers that arise through wandering about at unsuitable times in the streets): “There are six dangers, householder’s son, that arise through the habit of wandering about at unsuitable times in the streets. There is no protection nor safeguard of oneself, likewise are one’s wife and children defenceless and unprotected, one’s property is unguarded and unprotected, one gets suspected of evil crimes, false accusations are spread (about him) and he encounters manifold unpleasant situations. These are, householder’s son, six dangers that arise through the habit of wandering about at unsuitable times in the streets.”

(The six dangers that arise through frequenting fairs): “There are six dangers, householder’s son, that arise through frequenting fairs: ‘Where there is dancing; where there is singing; where there is music; where they are telling legends or are reciting; where they are making music by hands; where do they play drums?’ (Thinking in this way), these are the six dangers, householder’s son, that arise through frequenting fairs.”

(The six dangers that arise through becoming uncaring through gambling): “There are six dangers, householder’s son, that arise through becoming uncaring through gambling: His victory begets enemies; he bewails his possessions after his loss; his actual substance and wealth is wasted; amongst assemblies his word is no longer trusted; amongst his friends and colleagues he is disregarded and finding a suitable wife for marriage is discarded because ‘someone addicted to gambling will not be able to maintain a wife!’ These are the six dangers, householder’s son, that arise through getting uncaring through gambling.”

(The six dangers that arise through evil friendship) “There are six dangers, householder’s son, that arise through having evil friends: Anyone, being a gambler, a libertine, a drunkard, a cheat, a swindler and anyone who easily falls to violence is his friend, all these are his companions. These are the six dangers, householder’s son, that arise through having evil friends.”

(The six dangers that arise through idleness) “There are six dangers, householder’s son, that arise through idleness: ‘It is too cold!’ he says and does not perform any work; ‘it is too hot!’ he says and does not perform any work; ‘it is too early!’ he says and does not perform any work; ‘It is too late!’ he says and does not perform any work; ‘I am too hungry!’ he says and does not perform any work; ‘I am too full!’ he says and does not perform any work. Thus while under the pretext of many excuses he dwells neglecting his duties, wealth he hasn’t obtained he can not achieve and the wealth he has acquired comes to waste. These are the six dangers, householder’s son, that arise through idleness.” 
……
(Resembling friends) “There are four foes, householder’s son that should be known as they appear in the likeness of a friend: The one who takes everything, appears in the likeness of a friend; the one who talks in excess appears in the likeness of a friend; the one who flatters appears in the likeness of a friend and the one who is a fellow squanderer appears in the likeness of a friend.

One should understand that there are four reasons, householder’s son, why one who takes everything appears in the likeness of a friend: He takes what he can get; he desires a lot for little; he does his duty out of fear and he serves only to his own needs. Because of these four reasons it should be understood, householder’s son, that one who takes everything, appears in the likeness of a friend.

One should understand that there are four reasons, householder’s son, why one who talks in excess appears in the likeness of a friend: He recalls favours from the past; he expresses goodwill for the future; he is full of empty words and in regards of duties of the present he pretends misfortune. Because of these four reasons it should be understood, householder’s son, that one who talks in excess appears in the likeness of a friend.

One should understand that there are four reasons, householder’s son, why the one who flatters appears in the likeness of a friend: He approves of evil deeds; he likewise approves good actions; he praises one in one’s presence; he denigrates one in one’s absence. Because of these four reasons it should be understood, householder’s son, why one who flatters appears in the likeness of a friend.

One should understand that there are four reasons, householder’s son, why one who is a fellow squanderer appears in the likeness of a friend: He is a companion in occasions when indulging in liquor, wine or other all besotting substances that are the occasion for negligence; he is a companion when wandering about at unsuitable times in the streets; he is a companion when getting careless through gambling and he is a companion when frequenting festivals and fairs. Because of these four reasons it should be understood, householder’s son, why one who is a fellow squanderer appears in the likeness of a friend.”

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Siṅgālasuttaṃ: Siṅgāla + suttaṃ: Siṅgāla + sutta

Last modified: Wednesday, 4 May 2016, 3:11 PM