English Translation 3.7.4

3.7.2  Mastering the Sense-faculties1

 

…… “Then Ānanda, listen carefully, be alert and attentive, I will explain.” “Well, Bhante,” replied the venerable Ānanda to the Bhagava. The Bhagava spoke in the following way:

“What now, Ānanda, is the outstanding development of the senses in this Noble Discipline? Here, Ānanda, to a Bhikkhu, when seeing a visual object through the eyes there arises pleasantness, there arises disagreeableness and there arises neither liking nor disliking. He understands properly: ‘Here within me (the feeling of) pleasantness has arisen, within me (the feeling of) disagreeableness has arisen and within me (the feeling of) neither liking nor disliking has arisen. That indeed is compounded, gross and arisen from a cause. There is what is peaceful and excellent – that is equanimity!’ To him thus what has arisen as pleasantness, what has arisen as disagreeableness and what has arisen as neither liking nor disliking gets extinguished and equanimity remains. Just as, Ānanda, a man with good eyesight having opened his eyes would close them and having closed his eyes would open them, in the same way, Ānanda, as quickly, as speedy without any difficulty what has arisen as pleasantness, what has arisen as disagreeableness and what has arisen as neither liking nor disliking gets extinguished and equanimity established – this is, what is called, Ānanda, the outstanding development of the senses in this Noble Discipline regarding visible forms recognised by the eye.

And further, here, Ānanda, to a Bhikkhu, when hearing a sound through the ears there arises pleasantness, there arises disagreeableness and there arises neither liking nor disliking. He understands properly: ‘Here within me (the feeling of) pleasantness has arisen, within me (the feeling of) disagreeableness has arisen and within me (the feeling of) neither liking nor disliking has arisen. That indeed is compounded, gross and arisen from a cause. There is what is peaceful and excellent – that is equanimity!’ To him thus what has arisen as pleasantness, what has arisen as disagreeableness and what has arisen as neither liking nor disliking gets extinguished and equanimity remains. Just as, Ānanda, a strong man would snap his fingers without unease, in the same way, Ānanda, as quickly, as speedy without any difficulty what has arisen as pleasantness, what has arisen as disagreeableness and what has arisen as neither liking nor disliking gets extinguished and equanimity established – this is, what is called, Ānanda, the outstanding development of the senses in this Noble Discipline regarding hearing a sound through the ears.

And also, Ānanda, to a Bhikkhu, when smelling odour through the nose there arises pleasantness, there arises disagreeableness and there arises neither liking nor disliking. He understands properly: ‘Here within me (the feeling of) pleasantness has arisen, within me (the feeling of) disagreeableness has arisen and within me (the feeling of) neither liking nor disliking has arisen. That indeed is compounded, gross and arisen from a cause. There is what is peaceful and excellent – that is equanimity!’ To him thus what has arisen as pleasantness, what has arisen as disagreeableness and what has arisen as neither liking nor disliking gets extinguished and equanimity remains. Just as, Ānanda, any drop of water dripping on a lotus leaf, which is slightly turned downwards would fall down and not remain, in the same way, Ānanda, as quickly, as speedy without any difficulty what has arisen as pleasantness, what has arisen as disagreeableness and what has arisen as neither liking nor disliking gets extinguished and equanimity established – this is, what is called, Ānanda, the outstanding development of the senses in this Noble Discipline regarding smelling odour through the nose.

Further, Ānanda, to a Bhikkhu, when savouring any taste with the tongue there arises pleasantness, there arises disagreeableness and there arises neither liking nor disliking. He understands properly: ‘Here within me (the feeling of) pleasantness has arisen, within me (the feeling of) disagreeableness has arisen and within me (the feeling of) neither liking nor disliking has arisen. That indeed is compounded, gross and arisen from a cause. There is what is peaceful and excellent – that is equanimity!’ To him thus what has arisen as pleasantness, what has arisen as disagreeableness and what has arisen as neither liking nor disliking gets extinguished and equanimity remains. Just as, Ānanda, a strong man, feeling an accumulation of mucus on the tip of his tongue would spit it out promptly, in the same way, Ānanda, as quickly, as speedy without any difficulty what has arisen as pleasantness, what has arisen as disagreeableness and what has arisen as neither liking nor disliking gets extinguished and equanimity established – this is, what is called, Ānanda, the outstanding development of the senses in this Noble Discipline regarding savouring any taste with the tongue.

And again, Ānanda, to a Bhikkhu, when feeling a tangible object on the body there arises pleasantness, there arises disagreeableness and there arises neither liking nor disliking. He understands properly: ‘Here within me (the feeling of) pleasantness has arisen, within me (the feeling of) disagreeableness has arisen and within me (the feeling of) neither liking nor disliking has arisen. That indeed is compounded, gross and arisen from a cause. There is what is peaceful and excellent – that is equanimity!’ To him thus what has arisen as pleasantness, what has arisen as disagreeableness and what has arisen as neither liking nor disliking gets extinguished and equanimity remains. Just as, Ānanda, a strong man would stretch a bent arm and bend a stretched arm, in the same way, Ānanda, as quickly, as speedy without any difficulty what has arisen as pleasantness, what has arisen as disagreeableness and what has arisen as neither liking nor disliking gets extinguished and equanimity established – this is, what is called, Ānanda, the outstanding development of the senses in this Noble Discipline regarding feeling a tangible object on the body.

Again further, Ānanda, to a Bhikkhu, when distinguishing a mental object in the mind there arises pleasantness, there arises disagreeableness and there arises neither liking nor disliking. He understands properly: ‘Here within me (the feeling of) pleasantness has arisen, within me (the feeling of) disagreeableness has arisen and within me (the feeling of) neither liking nor disliking has arisen. That indeed is compounded, gross and arisen from a cause. There is what is peaceful and excellent – that is equanimity!’ To him thus what has arisen as pleasantness, what has arisen as disagreeableness and what has arisen as neither liking nor disliking gets extinguished and equanimity remains. Imagine, Ānanda, a strong man would let fall two or three drops of water on an iron-vessel, that was heated for a whole day. Even if these drops of water would fall down slowly, they would be quickly dissolved and vaporised. Likewise, Ānanda, as quickly, as speedy without any difficulty what has arisen as pleasantness, what has arisen as disagreeableness and what has arisen as neither liking nor disliking gets extinguished and equanimity established – this is, what is called, Ānanda, the outstanding development of the senses in this Noble Discipline regarding distinguishing a mental object in the mind.

This, Ānanda, is the outstanding development of the senses in this Noble Discipline.”

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1 - Indriyabhāvanāsuttaṃ: Indriya + bhāvanā + suttaṃ: sense faculties + development + sutta

Last modified: Wednesday, 20 December 2017, 2:52 PM